Foreign policy & defence

Terrorism

A focused campaign not a crusade

By Steven Everts
01 October 2001
As America comes to terms with the massive terrorist attacks on September 11, and as it frames and implements its response, the key question for Europe is: what should its role be?
France, Germany and "hard-core" Europe

France, Germany and "hard-core" Europe

01 August 2001
In Paris, thinking on the future of the EU tends to focus on two French worries. One is the decline of the Franco-German relationship, and the consequent threat to French influence.
Profiting from EU enlargement

Profiting from EU enlargement

Heather Grabbe
01 June 2001
Heather Grabbe weights up the risks of enlargement against the extra trade, investment and stability that enlargement will provide and argues that the price for the existing members will be small.
Time to act in the Middle East

Time to act in the Middle East

Steven Everts
01 June 2001
Once again the Middle East is facing a crisis with rising levels of hatred and violence on all sides. The death toll in the "second" intifadah stands at 450 Palestinians and around 100 Israelis and is rising. As a result, the prospects for a comprehensive peace accord are slipping ever further away.
EU should duplicate NATO assets

EU should duplicate NATO assets

Kori Schake
01 June 2001
Many American policy-makers are worried that the European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP) could undermine NATO and damage the transatlantic relationship.
Bulletin issue 18

Issue 18 - 2001

Steven Everts, John Monks, Kori Schake
25 May 2001
Europe's military revolution

Europe's military revolution

Charles Grant, Gilles Andréani, Christoph Bertram
02 March 2001
The creation of the single European currency, a revolutionary innovation for the European Union (EU), has provoked tumultuous debate across the continent and beyond. Yet the EU's plans for a common defence policy have - thus far - attracted less attention.
Unilateral America? Lightweight Europe?

Unilateral America? Lightweight Europe? Managing divergence in transatlantic foreign policy

Steven Everts
02 February 2001
The election of George W Bush as the new US President has caused uneasiness in Europe, both at the level of individual states and that of the European Union (EU). Bush has assembled an impressive team to work on foreign policy, including Colin Powell as the new Secretary of State,...
What comes after Nice

What comes after Nice

Heather Grabbe
02 February 2001
Both the outcome at Nice and the methods used to achieve it have left widespread dissatisfaction. Any deal would have been good for enlargement, in allowing the EU to move ahead. But the unseemly spectacle of 15 countries scrambling for position was hardly a shining example of inter-governmentalism at work....
Set a date for enlargement now

Set a date for enlargement now

Heather Grabbe
01 December 2000
The EU has an accession process, but still needs an enlargement strategy. The European Commission deserves credit for keeping the accession negotiations going, but we are reaching the limits of what the EU institutions can achieve.
Bulletin issue 21

Issue 21 - 2001

Andrew Cottey, Steven Everts, Alasdair Murray
24 November 2000
Opening the US defence market

Opening the US defence market

Alex Ashourne
03 November 2000
Many European defence companies aspire to gain access to the US defence market. America has the largest defence budget in the world – some $280 billion, or 3.3 per cent of GDP in 2000 – and is the source of much of the world's most advanced defence technology.
How flexible should Europe be?

How flexible should Europe be?

Ben Hall
06 October 2000
A European Union (EU) of 26 or more member-states will certainly be far more diverse – in economic, social, cultural and political terms – than the current one. Few people would argue that a monolithic, homogenous Union is what Europe needs.
European defence: The next steps

European defence: The next steps

Charles Grant, Christoph Bertram, François Heisbourg
02 October 2000
Last year, the Kosovo air war highlighted the impotence of Europe's armed forces.The Americans provided more than three-quarters of the bombs dropped, and most of the advanced communications equipment.
Bulletin issue 14

Issue 14 - 2000

Charles Grant, Christoph Bertram, François Heisbourg, Jacques Delors
29 September 2000
EU2010

EU2010: An optimistic view of the future

01 September 2000
The European Union's principal task in the first decades of the 21st century is to spread peace, stability, security and prosperity to the entire European continent. The chief mechanism for achieving this end is the enlargement of the Union.
Europe's military ambitions

Europe's military ambitions

Klaus Naumann
01 June 2000
The European Union's 'Headline Goal', agreed at the Helsinki Summit in December 1999, calls for the creation of a 60,000-strong rapid-reaction force by 2003. Turning that goal into reality is extremely difficult. To deploy and sustain such a force in a combat zone for a year would require - given...
Bulletin issue 12

Issue 12 - 2000

Charles Grant, Alasdair Murray, Klaus Naumann, Ben Hall
26 May 2000
Intimate relations: Can Britain play a leading role in European defence

Intimate relations: Can Britain play a leading role in European defence - and keep its special links to US intelligence?

05 May 2000
One of the most constant features of the geopolitical landscape is the special relationship between London and Washington on intelligence matters. One of the most rapidly changing and unpredictable elements of that landscape is the emergence of a European Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP).
Europe and missile defence

Europe and missile defence

03 April 2000
On each side of the Atlantic a new defence initiative is seen from the other side as unnecessary, confusing and worrying: the Europeans' plan for a European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP) and the Americans' plan for National Missile Defense (NMD).