Research

Competition policy

Breaking the EU's competition monopoly

Edward Bannerman
01 February 2002
As the EU's competition chief, Mario Monti can make or break the world's biggest companies. The exercise of his wide-ranging powers is always controversial. Last summer, he blocked the planned 50 billion euro GE-Honeywell merger.
Trade

The long road to Doha

Richard Cunningham and Peter Lichtenbaum
01 February 2002
The launch of a new round of multilateral trade negotiations by the World Trade Organisation (WTO) at Doha was not only a major accomplishment, it was a case of snatching victory from the jaws of defeat. As recently as six months ago, few would have predicted that the world's trading...
Communications

Europe must get on-message

Gareth Harding
01 February 2002
The EU spends 100 million euro each year on its communications budget, yet is demonstrably failing to 'connect' with Europe's 380 million citizens. Recent polls show that less than half of the EU's voters feel that membership of the 15-state club is a 'good thing',while turnout in European Parliament elections...
The future of EU competition policy

The future of EU competition policy

Edward Bannerman
01 February 2002
This report calls for a radical rethink of how competition policy is run. The author argues for a new 'European Competition Agency' to take the politics out of merger and anti-trust investigations.
Bulletin issue 22

Issue 22 - 2002

Edward Bannerman, Richard Cunningham, Peter Lichtenbaum, Gareth Harding
25 January 2002
Constructive duplication

Constructive duplication: Reducing EU reliance on US military assets

Dr Kori Schake
04 January 2002
In 'Constructive duplication', Kori Schake asserts that the Bush administration has taken a positive approach to the European Union's attempts to develop a military capability.
Preparing the EU for 2004

Preparing the EU for 2004

Heather Grabbe
07 December 2001
The debate about the future of Europe is supposed to consider how the Union will function after enlargement. In practice, the agenda set at Laeken addresses longstanding institutional problems, but does not pay sufficient attention to the qualitative changes that enlargement will bring.
Europe after September 11th

Europe after September 11th

Charles Grant, Edward Bannerman, Steven Everts, Heather Grabbe, Alasdair Murray
07 December 2001
This report argues that many good things have come out of the crisis, so far. The US is re-engaging with the world. The European Union has accelerated its plans to integrate in the fields of external and internal security.
Euro

The euro comes of age

Alasdair Murray
03 December 2001
A dozen years after the Delors Committee produced a plan for Economic and Monetary Union, the euro finally becomes a reality for 300 million Europeans this January.
NATO

NATO's big bang

Andrew Cottey
03 December 2001
In 2002 NATO has a rare opportunity to enhance stability in Eastern Europe and build a new relationship with Russia. At the Prague summit in November, the alliance should offer membership to seven countries - Bulgaria, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia.

Such a 'Big Bang' would consolidate pro-western democratic...
EU presidency

Time to abolish the EU's rotating presidency

Steven Everts
03 December 2001
The EU performance in foreign policy in the aftermath of September 11th has been underwhelming. European leaders have maintained unity on the substance of policy - a major step forward compared with the situation a decade ago.
Terrorism

A focused campaign not a crusade

By Steven Everts
01 October 2001
As America comes to terms with the massive terrorist attacks on September 11, and as it frames and implements its response, the key question for Europe is: what should its role be?
US, EU and Russia: A new order?

US, EU and Russia: A new order?

01 October 2001
In the aftermath of September 11th's horrific events, the world has focused on America's diplomatic and military response. Some of the security issues that commentators were worrying about before the terrorist attacks - such as missile defence, the Balkans and the future of NATO - have left the headlines.
Europe must tackle asylum

Europe must tackle asylum

Ben Hall
01 October 2001
Television images of migrants walking unabashed into the Channel Tunnel are a stark reminder of the fact that Britain is no longer an island.
Bulletin issue 20

Issue 20 - 2001

Charles Grant, Steven Everts, Ben Hall
28 September 2001
Policing global competition

Policing global competition

Edward Bannerman
01 August 2001
The fall-out from the European Commission's decision to veto the proposed $42 billion merger between General Electric and Honeywell shows how competition policy is becoming politicised.
France, Germany and "hard-core" Europe

France, Germany and "hard-core" Europe

01 August 2001
In Paris, thinking on the future of the EU tends to focus on two French worries. One is the decline of the Franco-German relationship, and the consequent threat to French influence.
Justice

Speeding up European justice

Matthew Heim
01 August 2001
The European Union's legal system is one of the most significant contributors to European cohesion, prosperity and peace; yet it is also one of the Union's least recognised strengths.
Bulletin issue 19

Issue 19 - 2001

Charles Grant, Edward Bannerman, Matthew Heim
27 July 2001
Time to act in the Middle East

Time to act in the Middle East

Steven Everts
01 June 2001
Once again the Middle East is facing a crisis with rising levels of hatred and violence on all sides. The death toll in the "second" intifadah stands at 450 Palestinians and around 100 Israelis and is rising. As a result, the prospects for a comprehensive peace accord are slipping ever further away.