EU institutions & treaties

We do not need a referendum

23 June 2007
The Guardian
Thank goodness for the agreement in Brussels last night. Without a deal, the EU would have been mired in arguments on treaties, institutions and process for a prolonged period.

Treaty would not concede new powers on foreign policy

21 June 2007
Financial Times
Sir,
Martin Wolf's critique of the proposed new EU treaty ("This is a cynical plan for an unnecessary European treaty", June 20) wrongly asserts that the new posts of "president" and "foreign minister" would "centralise decision-making in areas affecting security".
Each would replace the rotating presidency as, respectively, chair of the European...

Constitutional fudge

19 June 2007
The Guardian
So far, Britain's stance on the German attempt to revise the EU treaties has been - from a British perspective - broadly reasonable.

Britain would be unwise to thwart Europe's treaty

03 April 2007
Financial Times
Germany's ambition to salvage large parts of the European Union constitutional treaty may provoke a serious rift between Britain and its partners. Tony Blair and Gordon Brown may be heading for a collision over what to do about the German plan. But the general view in Britain seems to be...

The European Union at fifty: A second life

Aurore Wanlin
15 March 2007
Open democracy
On 25 March 2007, the European Union will celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the treaty of Rome, the founding document of what became today's union of twenty-seven member-states.

Get with it, Europe

09 March 2007
The International Herald Tribune
It is seven years since the European Union launched its Lisbon agenda of economic reforms aimed at transforming the competitiveness of the European economy by 2010. Despite the pessimism, there has been much to cheer.

Adieu, Europe?

29 June 2006
Open democracy
The machinery of the European Union has recovered from the shock of the failed French and Dutch referenda, but not the heart that pumps it, says Aurore Wanlin.
When the French and the Dutch voted against the draft European Union constitution in May 2005, many thought this was an unprecedented crisis...

What new transatlantic institutions?

Charles Grant, Mark Leonard
01 June 2006
European Affairs
The last two years have seen a rapprochement across the Atlantic. The elevation of new personnel – such as Condoleezza Rice to the State Department and Angela Merkel as German Chancellor – has helped to remove some of the bitterness that the Iraq confrontation had left behind.

Sluggish EU 'Lisbon Agenda' bodes ill for modernisation

Aurore Wanlin
01 June 2006
European Affairs
Europe has gotten off to a bad start in 2006 with a fresh battering of the 'Lisbon agenda.' Protectionism is on the rise across the European Union.

Viewpoints: Europe's way forward

Mark Leonard
30 January 2006
BBC News
Confidence - A lot of the sense of crisis is self-generated. As soon as European leaders start dealing with pressing problems in a visible way, like building up the foreign policy machinery, dealing with migration and terrorism and modernising their economies and welfare states, then citizens will be less sceptical.

"Son problème, c'est l'Allemagne"

10 January 2006
Liberation.fr
Le Britannique Charles Grant, directeur du Centre pour la réforme européenne, à Londres, analyse les chances du président français de sortir l'Europe de sa crise institutionnelle.
Jacques Chirac est-il crédible quand il propose de relancer l'Europe ?
Si cela veut dire relancer la Constitution européenne, il n'est pas crédible. Mais personne ne...

Staring into the abyss

01 July 2005
E!Sharp
Twenty years of progress towards a united Europe have come to an end with the French and Dutch votes against the constitution, with future expansion of the EU likely to be the biggest casualty, argues Charles Grant, director of the Centre for European Reform.

Europe - Don't write the obituaries yet. A new France could put Britain on the sidelines

Mark Leonard
06 June 2005
New Statesman
The gleeful obituaries are piling up, not just for the EU constitution, but for the country that torpedoed it. France is in a mess, we read; its politics are paralysed, its economy is over-regulated and it just can't accommodate itself to globalisation with an Anglo-Saxon face.
But before we gorge on...

Europe - Did we make the right choice?

03 June 2005
Yorkshire Post
Though often criticised as being undemocratic, popular referenda have been pivotal in the history of the European Union. Recent events in France and Netherlands aside, perhaps none more so than the 1975 poll confirming Britain's membership of the then European Economic Community.

European democracy: Where now?

Aurore Wanlin
02 June 2005
Open democracy
The rejection by French and Dutch voters of the treaty establishing a European constitution has precipitated one of the deepest crises in the European Union's fifty-year history.

Europe must keep its 'soft power'

Carl Bildt
01 June 2005
Financial Times
In the aftermath of the French rejection of the European Union constitution, on the eve of the Dutch referendum and amid political uncertainty in Germany, there is a growing risk that the EU will start to backtrack on its commitment to continued enlargement.
Yet, in recent years, Europe has prided itself...

Tony Blair invite les Européens à réfléchir au non français

31 May 2005
Le Monde
Il faudra attendre lundi 6 juin pour savoir officiellement si le Royaume-Uni renonce à organiser son propre référendum sur la Constitution de l'Union européenne.

Un sale coup pour Blair

Daniel Keohane
30 May 2005
L'Express
Comment réagit-on outre-Manche au non du peuple français?
Beaucoup de Britanniques opposés à la Constitution s'en réjouissent! Chez les conservateurs, dans la presse de droite europhobe, même au sein du Labour, où tout un courant ne veut pas de ce traité. Pour Tony Blair et le gouvernement britannique, c'est au contraire...

There is life beyond a European constitution

23 May 2005
Financial Times
A No vote in France's referendum on the European Union constitutional treaty could open up a period of confusion, uncertainty and recrimination.

Si le France rejette le traité, il ne se passera rien

21 May 2005
Liberation.fr
Si les Français votent non le 29 mai, la Constitution europénne est morte. Ni un second référendum en France ni une renégociation du traité ne sont plausibles. Dès lors trois options sont possibles.
La première est qu'il ne se passera rien. Les chefs de gouvernement vont se rencontrer, enterrer le traité...