Single market, competition & trade

The euro at ten

The euro at ten: Is its future secure?

07 January 2009
The euro is riding high and the financial crisis has illustrated the safe haven that membership provides. On the face of it, the future of the single currency looks rosy.
State, money and rules

State, money and rules: An EU policy for sovereign investments

Simon Tilford, Katinka Barysch, Philip Whyte
01 December 2008
The debate about sovereign wealth funds will return as global growth and commodity prices recover. European governments have been right to reject new EU rules on SWFs, and instead support multilateral efforts to set voluntary standards.
The EU's fleeting chance for global leadership

The EU's fleeting chance for global leadership

01 December 2008
The economic crisis offers unprecedented opportunities for reforming global rules and institutions. Furthermore, the Obama presidency - which Europeans expect to be less unilateralist than that of George W Bush - will give the EU a chance to work with the US in tackling a host of international problems.
Is EU competition policy an obstacle to innovation and growth?

Is EU competition policy an obstacle to innovation and growth?

20 November 2008
European countries need to improve their record of developing high-tech businesses if they are to prosper. This was explicitly recognised in the EU's Lisbon agenda of economic reforms launched in 2000. The reasons for Europe's poor record of innovation are complex, but one factor may be competition policy.
The Commission's economic forecasts are still too complacent

The Commission's economic forecasts are still too complacent

07 November 2008
On the face of it, it appears churlish to accuse the Commission of complacency when it is forecasting no growth in the eurozone economy in 2009 and a deep recession in the UK.
Lessons from the financial crisis: A twin-track response

Lessons from the financial crisis: A twin-track response

Philip Whyte
05 November 2008
The credit crunch has unleashed widespread anger outside the financial sector. And rightly so. Not only have taxpayers had to bail out an industry that is uncommonly well rewarded. But the effects of the credit crunch on the real economy are likely to be painful and prolonged – not least on the jobs market.
Beyond banking: What the financial crisis means for the EU

Beyond banking: What the financial crisis means for the EU

Charles Grant, Clara Marina O'Donnell, Hugo Brady, Katinka Barysch, Philip Whyte, Simon Tilford, Tomas Valasek
23 October 2008
The world is in the midst of a financial crisis which will have far-reaching implications for the EU – not just for the region's immediate economic outlook, but also for the future of the euro, financial regulation, economic reform and global governance.
Another Great Depression?

Another Great Depression?

Katinka Barysch
15 October 2008
Many observers have drawn parallels between the current economic crisis and the Great Depression of the 1930s. However, the stock market collapse of 1929 did not directly cause what turned out to be the deepest and most prolonged recession of modern times, ultimately ending in the Second World War.
Scapegoating the US lets others off too easily

Scapegoating the US lets others off too easily

02 October 2008
Huge amounts have been said about the consequences of the credit crunch for the US and UK economies. They undoubtedly face major adjustments, and several years of very weak economic growth.
How strong is Russia's economic foundation?

How strong is Russia's economic foundation?

Pekka Sutela
01 October 2008
Russia's economy is in deep recession. Many Russians hope that rising oil prices will quickly restore the high growth rates their country enjoyed before 2008.
Options for EU trade policy

Options for EU trade policy

Philip Whyte
01 October 2008
In late July, the Doha round suffered its umpteenth setback, when ministers from the member-states of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) failed to agree on a package to liberalise world trade.
In defence of Anglo-Saxon capitalism

In defence of Anglo-Saxon capitalism

29 September 2008
Those who never liked ‘Anglo-Saxon’ capitalism are feeling smug. Marxists, fans of ‘Rhineland’ capitalism and those who simply cannot stand American power are crowing.
Bulletin issue 62

Issue 62 - 2008

Charles Grant, Philip Whyte, Bobo Lo
26 September 2008
Farewell, Polish plumber

Farewell, Polish plumber

Philip Whyte
07 August 2008
When the EU expanded its membership in 2004, the UK was one of only three EU countries – Ireland and Sweden were the others – fully to open its borders to migrants from the ten new member states.
A new European mercantilism?

A new European mercantilism?

01 August 2008
Europe’s economic liberals have had a successful ten years. There have been protectionist pressures throughout this period, of course.
Should Europeans care about Doha?

Should Europeans care about Doha?

Katinka Barysch
30 July 2008
Are the Doha trade talks finally dead? Following the failure of the latest ministerial meeting in Geneva on July 29th, there will be little appetite for another big push to resolve disputes over farm subsidies and manufacturing tariffs.
Eurozone economic outlook

Eurozone economic outlook: Too much complacency

03 April 2008
A year ago the prospect of the dollar falling to 1.60 against the euro would have brought on cold sweats across Europe. Yet, here we are and there is no sense of crisis.
Liberal reforms are no threat to social Europe

Liberal reforms are no threat to social Europe

Philip Whyte
01 April 2008
Europeans have long sought to reconcile markets with social solidarity. The EU’s economic reform programme, the Lisbon agenda, falls squarely within this tradition. Launched in 2000, its vaulting ambition was to turn the EU into the “most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world by 2010”.